#Qtip: Four things to know about Qatari women’s weddings

Weddings tend to be a lavish affair in Qatar, especially for local women. Typically, the celebrations are separated by gender.

While men’s weddings are generally casual and open to typically everyone, women’s are invite-only and pretty fancy.

This is because women take weddings very seriously, according to Aisha Al-Ziani at I Love Qatar, which came out with a Qtip on the subject this week.

Lesley Walker

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Speaking to Doha News, she explained that weddings in Qatar are large and “far from being considered simple.”

She continued:

“Sometimes thousands of people can attend the wedding, and therefore the wedding has to meet the needs and standards of most of the guests.

Wedding halls have to be big enough to host such a big number of people, and different kinds of delicacies and cuisines are served in abundance, all to express generosity and welcome people that are here to celebrate the union of the two souls.”

In her Qtip, Al-Ziani highlights some things you may not already know about these celebrations:

1) No phone zone

During wedding celebrations, women aren’t wearing their abayas and hijabs.

Pixabay

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

So phones and cameras may be taken away at the entrance to the wedding to protect guests’ privacy and modesty, Al-Ziani says.

2) Don’t bring gifts

When going to a Qatari wedding, there’s no need to rack your brain about what to get the new couple.

FutUndBeidl/Flickr

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

The bride and groom aren’t expecting their guests to bring any gifts, and instead will likely show their appreciation to attendees by giving them stuff, Al-Ziani says.

3) Dress to impress

Expect the evening to be filled with dancing and fashion show-esque fun.

Ren Wlasiuk

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Women will be dressed in their finest clothes, and some might even throw cash at you. This is simply to celebrate the bride and “express generosity,” Al-Ziani says.

4) No men allowed (except the groom)

Though this is a segregated affair and men aren’t allowed in the hall, there is one exception: when the groom arrives to take photos with his wife.

David Precious/Flickr

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

“And that’s when you see everyone running around trying to cover up,” Al-Ziani quips.

Have you ever been to a Qatari wedding? Thoughts?

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