New Al Rayyan expressway, truck bypass part of Ashghal’s building boom

A rendering of the upgraded Al Rayyan Road

Ashghal

A rendering of what the upgraded Al Rayyan Road might look like

Motorists will find it tough to avoid road construction in the coming months and years as Qatar’s public works authority spends billions of riyals to expand the country’s transportation network.

Two months after issuing tenders to overhaul and widen C-Ring Road, Ashghal signed QR10.18 billion (US$2.8 billion) in contracts on Sunday to construct new expressways, upgrade existing streets and extend roads and other services to developing communities.

One of the biggest initiatives involves turning 8.2 kilometers of Al Rayyan Road into an eight-lane expressway with multi-level junctions, which Ashghal has broken into two projects:

Al Rayyan Road (western portion)

rendering2

Ashghal

Construction crews will turn the 2.9-kilometer portion of road between the Bani Hajer Roundabout, at Al Luqta Street, in the west and the New Al Rayyan Roundabout at Furousiya Street and Huwar Street in the east into an eight-lane expressway.

Roughly two kilometers of side roads and 5.8 kilometers of service roads, along with new pedestrian footpaths and cycleways, will also be constructed.

Two-level interchanges will be built at Al Rayyan Road and Al Wajbah Street as well as at Castle Roundabout at Al Rayyan Road and Al Qalah Street.

Timeline: Starts in the first quarter of 2014; scheduled to be completed in the third quarter of 2016.
Companies: Joint venture between Six Construct Qatar Ltd. and Boom Construction
Cost: QR1.02 billion (US$280.05 million)

Al Rayyan Road (eastern portion)

Al Rayyan Road

This project targets the approximately 5.3-kilometer stretch of road between Sports Roundabout – referred to by Ashghal as Olympic Roundabout – by the Women’s Hospital in the east and the New Al Rayyan Roundabout in the west.

Al Rayyan Road will become four lanes in each direction, separated by a central median, and receive new service roads and a network of pedestrian footpaths.

The main interchanges will be divided by underpasses and flyovers so through traffic can continue unimpeded.

Timeline: Starts in the first quarter of 2014; scheduled to be completed in the first quarter of 2017.
Companies: Joint venture between Dogus Holding and Onur.
Cost: QR3.43 billion (US$942.8 million)

Orbital Highway

orbital-highway

Ashghal

A new expressway running between Al Khor and Mesaieed is envisioned to ultimately become a 180-kilometre route connecting the industrial cities of Ras Laffan and Mesaieed that reduces the number of trucks travelling through Doha.

The first phase of the project includes 45 kilometres of the highway located southwest of Doha. It connects the new Doha Port and Al Wakrah bypass with the future phases of the project. It also includes construction of a road linking Mesaieed Road to the east-west corridor.

Timeline: Starts in the first quarter of 2014; scheduled to be completed in the first quarter of 2017.
Companies: Joint venture between J&P Overseas Ltd. and J&P Avax S.A.
Cost: QR3.26 billion (US$895.9 million)

Sunday’s contract-signing ceremony also included projects aimed at upgrading the infrastructure in several commercial, industrial and development areas:

Commercial Street in Al Khor

alkhor

Ashghal

This developed area will receive new roads, drainage systems, parking bays and signal-controlled traffic intersections.

Timeline: Starts in the first quarter of 2014; scheduled to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2015.
Companies: Gulf Consolidated Contractors.
Cost: QR245.07 million (US$67.3 million)

Industrial Area rehabilitation

industrial-area

Ashghal

This project will address the “infrastructure deficiency” in the Industrial Area by upgrading roads, traffic signals, street lighting, pedestrian and cycling routes as well as overhauling sewer systems.

The work will likely be welcome by residents and business owners in the Industrial Area, which is notorious for flooding when it rains, mixing stagnant water with human sewage and trash.

Timeline: Starts in the first quarter of 2014; scheduled to be completed in the third quarter of 2016.
Companies: Joint venture between MSF Engenharia SA and Qatar Trading and Contracting Group.
Cost: QR1.36 billion (US$373.61 million)

North and east Al Kheesa (Rawdat Al Hamama district)

alkheesa

There are currently 800 properties under construction in the 3,373-acre area located 10 kilometres north of central Doha, past Qatar University and the Pearl-Qatar between the Al Khor Expressway and Al Shamal Road. While there are several temporary access roads, there are no permanent streets on the site, according to Ashghal.

This first phase covers 11 percent of the Al Kheesa development area and will extend services to 654 residential plots, three commercial properties, two schools, nine mosques, a dozen public gardens, three vehicle parking lots as well as 20 other buildings.

When fully built out, the site is expected to accommodate approximately 4,000 residential properties.

Timeline: Starts in the first quarter of 2014; scheduled to be completed in the third quarter of 2015.
Companies: Joint venture between MSF Engenharia SA and Qatar Trading and Contracting Group.
Cost: QR313 million (US$85.95 million)

Rawdat Abal Heeran

heeran

Ashghal

This project extends 40 kilometres of roads as well as drainage and related infrastructure to 773.44 acres of open desert on the western periphery of Doha, north of Sailiya Road in Al Rayyan municipality.

This will service 1,102 residential plots, four schools, 15 mosques, 42 parks, one government facility and 61 other buildings.

Timeline: Starts in the first quarter of 2014; scheduled to be completed in the first quarter of 2016.
Companies: QBS International
Cost: QR547.23 million (US$150.28 million)

How do you think these projects will change driving in Qatar? Thoughts?

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